A fresh face at LBD

Hi! This is a post to introduce myself, Carmen Nave, to you. Lenore is my sister, and I’m joining her as a partner in Lenore Brooks Design.

Who I am

Obviously, like Lenore, I grew up in a DIY loving family that moved a lot, so I also have lots of experience with the more casual side of design. I also own a century home in Kitchener, which means I have a lot of experience with plaster wall, lack of insulation, crumbling DIY renos from the 1950s and more.

As well as being a homeowner, I am also an anthropologist. Now, this might not seem like the closest fit with a design company at first, but if you break it down, anthropology is about people and design is about space, so together Lenore and I are experts in people and space. And that’s going to make for a great combo!

Why I’m here

I’m absolutely passionate about design. It’s easy to think of design as fashion: design magazines and blogs look at the latest trends, the coolest style and so on. And all that is fun and great, don’t get me wrong!

But as an anthropologist, I see design as fundamental to how we live our lives.

Think about it: nearly every space you move through in the course of the day was created by people. People who were solving problems and meeting their needs, maybe in ways that also solve your problems but maybe in ways that create new ones!

Take the century home for example: little insulation, lots of small rooms with doors, and small closets are some of the typical features. These homes provided comfortable spaces for people who lived without a lot of stuff, and who did much of their socializing outside the home, at a time when fuel was cheap and abundant.

Times have changed. We do much of our socializing in our homes, have more stuff, and are concerned about both the financial and environmental cost of fuel. The designs that solved the problems of the 1920s ARE the problems of the 2020s.

I believe that well-designed spaces have the ability to help us live better and more fulfilling lives. For me, that doesn’t necessarily mean a magazine-perfect sort of space. Instead, it means the sort of design that allows you to make the best use of your environment, to move through your space easily, to relax or work or socialize in your space in the best possible ways.

In short, I see interior design as a way to solve certain kinds of problems.

What’s coming next for Lenore Brooks Design

Now that I’m on board, Lenore is going to have time to take on more clients (yay!) and I’m going to take over the communication side of things. That means more blog posts, and in the coming months, a YouTube channel focusing on problem-solving design projects, how to videos, and more.

Is there anything you’d like to see us tackle, any design problems you’re trying to solve? Let us know in the comments, or just say hi. I’m really looking forward to work with Lenore, and to finding out more about our readers!

Comments

  1. I’m so happy to hear of your new collaboration! And I love the connection between design and anthropology. Of course there is a strong connection! In my urban planning studies, we were trained to start with the people. Design consciousness seems to run in the family. Best of luck in this venture–a very unique partnership of viewpoints, and one that is really needed.

    1. Author

      Thanks so much! We’ve definitely already started to notice that our combined perspectives open up some interesting avenues to explore.

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